Sunday, 12 February 2012

Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus)
In all languages the name of this bird suggests that it belongs to the Tit family, but just like the Penduline Tit it does not. This attractive and lively bird can never be seen alone. It rather travels in small groups and in winter such a group will visit the food table in your garden, but irregularly and for a relatively short period of time only. In the garden the bird is not afraid of people and often you can see them in a nearby tree or bush.
This bird belongs to the family of Long-tailed Tits (Aegithalidae). The bird is 5,5" and weighs 9 grams. It lives in woodlands, heather, parks and gardens mostly. It eats insects and spiders. The sexes do not differ from one another. No less than eight to ten eggs are laid in the nest, which is constructed in bushes in april. Breeding takes 13 days and after another 14 days the young can fly and will leave the nest.
Yellowhammer (Emberiza citrinella) Males are unmistakeable with a bright yellow head and underparts, brown back streaked with black, and chestnut rump. In flight it shows white outer tail feathers. Often seen perched on top of a hedge or bush, singing. Its recent population decline make it a Red List species. Found across the UK but are least abundant in the north and west, and absent from some upland areas, such as the Pennines and Highlands of Scotland, as well as some lowland areas, such as the Inner Hebrides and the Orkneys. Look in open countryside with bushes and hedgerows.

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